September 2022 Issue

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WHAT  ARE   TENNESSEE   MEAT  GOATS™?

In the early 1990's, Suzanne W. Gasparotto, owner of Onion Creek Ranch in Texas,    trademarked   as   Tennessee Meat Goats™   those goats from  the Myotonic breed that she developed at Onion Creek Ranch that  are   heavily muscled,  wide and deep bodied, larger framed than typical Myotonic goats, and produce  a   4 to 1 meat-to-bone ratio.   Higher meat-to-bone ratio means more MEAT, less waste, and more dollars in producers' pockets.

Linebreeding was avoided, because linebreeding results in the loss of both meat and hardiness.     No dairy-goat genetics were used to develop the Tennessee Meat Goat™.  Only those animals who meet the criteria developed by  Suzanne Gasparotto at  Onion Creek Ranch can be identified as  Tennessee Meat Goats™.

All fullblood Tennessee Meat Goats™ are Myotonic, but few Myotonics can qualify to be called Tennessee Meat Goats™.

Most  Myotonic goats are small to medium-sized and seldom achieve more than 100 pounds mature weight. Some are muscled, but many of them are not. Many  are pet-quality  not intended  for meat production.

There are two long-established full-time working goat ranches from which you should  buy  genuine certified Tennessee Meat Goat™ genetics:    Suzanne W. Gasparotto at Onion Creek Ranch in Texas and Pat Cotten at Bending Tree Ranch in Arkansas.    It is the  unfortunate truth that  no other producers have the longevity and experience with this breed that Suzanne and Pat have.

Onion Creek Ranch  and Bending Tree Ranch offer  heavily-muscled, excellent conformation breeding stock goats at affordable prices.  These   fullblood Tennessee Meat Goats™  are playing a significant role in putting MEAT into  the American MEAT goat industry.      With their 4:1 meat-to-bone ratio, Tennessee Meat Goats™ produce more useable meat  on other-breed does' offspring .

Shipping is available at the buyer's expense.   Truck/trailer  transport is offered by several livestock haulers whose names can be provided  for you to contact to  make shipping  arrangements.  You may also check with  fellow goat raisers or  goat groups about haulers currently in operation.

For information and pricing on Tennessee Meat Goats™, contact  Suzanne W. Gasparotto at Onion Creek Ranch in Texas at onioncrk@centex.net  or call 512 265 2090,  or Pat Cotten at Bending Tree Ranch in Arkansas by private messenger at Bending Tree Ranch on Facebook.

If it has MEAT on it, it has MYOTONIC in it.                        9.1.22

Subscribe FREE now! Monthly issues with new articles and other educational information on meat goat health, nutrition, and management written by Suzanne W. Gasparotto of Onion Creek Ranch and Pat Cotten of Bending Tree Ranch. In all cases, it is your responsibility to obtain veterinary services and advice before using any of the information provided in these articles. Neither Suzanne Gasparotto nor Pat Cotten are veterinarians. None of the contributors to this website will be held responsible for the use of any information contained herein.

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Young Tennessee Meat Goat™ doe

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Mature Tennessee Meat Goat™ bucks

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WHAT  ARE  TEXMASTER™   MEAT  GOATS?
The Superior Commercial Meat Goat Breed

After I imported a trio of Boers from New Zealand in the early 1990's, I began to wonder why people were so excited about Boers as "meat" goats.   My Myotonics had far more meat on them, were much easier to manage,  kidded easily,  and cost less  to feed.   I asked myself this question:  Why can't I take the more heavily muscled fullblood Myotonic bucks that I  trademarked  as Tennessee Meat Goats™, breed them to Boer does, and begin  the development of a new meat  goat breed that puts  more MEAT on the offspring (coming from the TMG sires) and with a bit faster growth rate and frame size (contributed by the Boer females)?   So in  1994, I began the multi-year  process of creating the superior  commercial meat goat breed that I trademarked as TexMaster™.

A minimum of seven generations of breeding is required to produce animals that breed "true."  Breeding "true" means that breeding pairs reproduce offspring with consistent characteristics, i.e. they produce traits that  replicate themselves from goat to goat  with enough consistency of conformation to be called a  BREED.   This is the  definition of a BREED.  I have been  producing TexMasters™ for over 25  years.  That's a lot of breedings and cullings.

TexMasters™ are not    a cross breed  of Tennessee Meat Goat™ bucks  and Boer does.     TexMasters™ are the result of many years of crossing,  evaluating, re-evaluating, re-crossing, and heavily culling   in every generation.    More importantly, TexMasters™ are the product of Onion Creek Ranch Tennessee Meat Goat™ genetics and specially-bred  Tennessee Meat Goat-Boer  cross does produced at Onion Creek Ranch in Texas.

The obvious dairy influence in Boers actually took MEAT off the offspring, so I decreased the amount of "Boer" in TexMaster™, resulting in a slight reduction  in frame size (less waste) and a significant increase in MEAT.     Only  Tennessee Meat Goat™ bucks were used as foundation sires.  I used just enough of the Boer on the maternal side to  increase   the growth rate  of the offspring slightly.

The precise formula is proprietary, i.e. Onion Creek Ranch's  trade secret.  The MEAT on the TexMaster™ comes from Onion Creek Ranch Tennessee Meat Goat™  sires;  the meat does not  come from the Boer females.    The TexMaster™ breed retains the hardiness of the Tennessee Meat Goat™   with excellent mothering instincts, ease of kidding, lower maintenance, and most importantly higher meat-to-bone ratio than any breed other than fullblood TMGs.  TexMasters™ are in use in many commercial herds across the USA.    TexMasters™ are also used by many folks in the show-goat business.

If you want to produce commercial goats, you should buy and use authentic TexMaster™  genetics as herd sires.   Do NOT   use "bred-up" crosses as sires   because you will   be including  genetics of other breeds.   You  will lose the MEAT advantage provided by Tennessee Meat Goat™ sires that make TexMasters™ so desirable as a terminal meat animal.

Example:  If you buy a percentage TexMaster™ buck because a producer is close to you or it is cheaper than you can buy a fullblood TexMaster™ buck genetics  from Onion Creek Ranch  or Bending Tree Ranch,    you  will be getting a goat that is   the offspring of a TexMaster™ buck and does that are not the specially-developed Onion Creek Ranch genetics.   Such offspring would be   a 50% TexMaster™ since the sire is a fullblood TexMaster™.  But that 50% TexMaster™ isn't going to have anything close to the amount of meat on it that a  fullblood TexMaster™ out of Onion Creek Ranch  or Bending Tree Ranch genetics has on it.   Crossing with other breeds like Kiko, Spanish, and fullblood dairy goats decreases  the "meatiness" of the offspring compared to what you can achieve with fullblood TexMasters™.

Your buck is at least 50% of your herd and actually   75% if you keep any replacement does. You should always be working towards acquiring better genetics, especially  for your herd sires.      Buy the best herd sire that you can afford.  Stretch a little financially and you will get more "bang for your buck" at breeding time.    QUALITY should be your goal.

If you are interested in purchasing  fullblood TexMasters™, come to the source.  Contact Suzanne W. Gasparotto at Onion Creek Ranch in Texas or Pat Cotten at Bending Tree Ranch in Arkansas.  No one else has our experience,  our depth of genetics, or our  knowledge of these goats.   Suzanne Gasparotto can be reached at  512 265 2090 or emailing onioncrk@centex.net  and Pat Cotten can be reached  by  private messenger at  Bending Tree Ranch  on Facebook.  If you cannot reach one of us, contact the other.  We are in regular contact,  share information about inquiries, and work together to fill orders.

Suzanne Gasparotto, Onion Creek Ranch, Texas     9.1.22

Mature TexMaster™ does

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Mature TexMaster™ bucks

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BendingTree Ranch TexMaster Goats

Pat Cotten 501-679-4936
Bending Tree Ranch located near Greenbrier, Arkansas
www.bendingtreeranch.com
bendingtreeranch@gmail.com

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2022 buck kids are weaned and ready to go to work

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All information and photos copyright © Onion Creek Ranch and may not be used without express written permission of Onion Creek Ranch. TENNESSEE MEAT GOAT ™ and TEXMASTER™ are Trademarks of Onion Creek Ranch . All artwork and graphics © DTP, Ink and Onion Creek Ranch.

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